BBC100: WHAT WE KNOW SO FAR AND PROGRAMMING HIGHLIGHTS

To mark 100 years of the BBC in, the BBC will air a special week of programming, beginning on Saturday 22 October.



Here's what we know so far...

STRICTLY COME DANCING

Celebrating 100 years of the BBC, the fun-filled new themed episode will see each of the couples take to the Strictly ballroom floor, either dancing to a theme tune from an iconic BBC programme or in tribute to one of the BBC’s most loved services.



There will also be two dazzling professional routines, one dedicated to the BBC’s natural history programming and another that will see our professional dancers “crashing” some of the BBC’s flagship shows.


DOCTOR WHO: THE POWER OF THE DOCTOR

The blockbuster 90-minute special will be the final outing for Jodie Whittaker's Thirteenth Doctor. The Doctor faces the ultimate battle for survival as she confronts the Daleks, Cybermen and The Master (Sacha Dhawan).



Also starring in the special are the Doctor's friends Yaz (Mandip Gill) and Dan (John Bishop) alongside former companions Tegan (Janet Fielding) and Ace (Sophie Aldred). Who is attacking a bullet train on the edge of a distant galaxy?


THE LOVE BOX IN YOUR LIVING ROOM

Examined through the eyes of "Adam Adamant Curtis" and his brother "Richard Dimbleby Curtis", comedy The Love Box In Your Living Room, “charts the intertwined socio-litical history of the British and their BBC since its quasi-religious birth on that great day in 1922”.


Mixing contemporary footage with “genuinely authentic made-up stuff”. The Love Box In Your Living Room is faithfully concocted by Harry Enfield and Paul Whitehouse.



HERE'S ONE I MADE EARLIER (w/t)

From the very first radio broadcast of Children’s Hour in 1922, via the iconic Magic Roundabout and the chaotic fun of Tiswas, right through to Saturday morning megahits such as Going Live and SMTV, Here’s One I Made Earlier promises to treat viewers to the ultimate story of one of the most important TV genres.


Blue Peter’s longest serving female presenter, Konnie Huq, will guide viewers through this extraordinary cultural and historical adventure, featuring not only nostalgic highlights from the past century, but also showcasing how Children’s TV has been at the forefront of change, social progression and inclusivity.



HORRIBLE HISTORIES: BBC's BIG BIRTHDAY BONANZA

On Auntie’s Big Birthday, Horrible Histories celebrates the Corporation’s past century packed with fascinating facts and jokes. The first Director General, Lord Reith, reveals why he needed a postman’s help with his job application.


We find out why the Queen’s Coronation made you the most popular house on the street if you had a TV, and how the launch night of BBC Two went awry, with not only a power cut, but also an escaped kangaroo!



Radio announcer Wilfred Pickles confounds Britain’s enemies with his Yorkshire accent, and how the creators of Doctor Who thought they were making a history programme. And from Bill and Ben to Tracy Beaker, Swap Shop to Blue Peter, how the BBC’s Children’s department has inspired the imagination of generations of kids.


THE BBC's FIRST 50 YEARS

In two feature-length documentaries The BBC’s first 50 years will explore how the challenges and triumphs of today’s BBC have their roots in the corporation’s first half century.



Ever since John Reith launched BBC Radio in 1922, the rapid pace of technological change has driven editorial priorities and opened up fresh opportunities – and the changing shape of British society has fuelled the debate over whether the national broadcaster should lead or follow new social attitudes.


At the same time, the BBC’s international broadcasting has exported British values, while giving domestic audiences a window on the world.



More details will be revealed in due course.